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Archive for the ‘advertising’ Category

High-Rise: All the Trailers and Clips So Far

By • Mar 13th, 2016 •

Category: advertising, alternate worlds, architecture, Ben Wheatley, brutalism, consumerism, death of affect, dystopia, features, gated communities, Interior design, Lead Story, urban decay, urban revolt, urban ruins, utopia

High-Rise, Ben Wheatley’s adaptation of J.G. Ballard’s novel, is released in the UK on 18 March. To celebrate, here’s a collection of all the clips and trailers so far.



High-Rise: All the Posters So Far

By • Mar 3rd, 2016 •

Category: advertising, Ben Wheatley, features, film, Lead Story, visual art

Feast your eyes on all the promotional posters for Ben Wheatley’s High-Rise…

“There comes a time when some sort of radical action is needed. Some of my novels, like High-Rise, are terrorist novels in that they’re designed to deliberately provoke.” J.G. Ballard.



High-Rise: Wheatley vs Cronenberg

By • Dec 15th, 2015 •

Category: advertising, alternate worlds, architecture, Ben Wheatley, brutalism, David Cronenberg, drained swimming pools, dystopia, features, film, Lead Story, leisure, urban revolt, urbanism

High-Rise, Ben Wheatley’s much-anticipated adaptation of the J.G. Ballard novel, goes on general release in March 2016. The first trailer was released recently, bringing excitement to the boil, for not only does the trailer adapt Ballard, it also homages Cronenberg.



Venus Smiled: Tribute to Claire Walsh

By • Oct 21st, 2014 •

Category: advertising, Ambit magazine, architecture, Barcelona, biography, Claire Churchill, features, invisible literature, Lead Story, Michael Moorcock, New Worlds, visual art, Will Self

Recently, Claire Walsh died after battling with cancer. She was an editor and literary publicist, and J.G. Ballard’s long-time partner. Her intellect matched Ballard’s and pushed him into new territories, inspiring some of his best work. Collecting quotes from Ballard, Claire and articles from Ballardian and beyond, this tribute to Claire Walsh illustrates their symbiotic relationship.



London Event: Simon Sellars: A Secret History of Ballardian Cinema

By • May 26th, 2014 •

Category: advertising, Ballardosphere, film, Lead Story

Join Simon Sellars (publisher of ballardian.com, and co-editor of Extreme Metaphors: Interviews with J.G. Ballard) for a multimedia excursion through the alternate history of Ballard’s impact on film. Shoreditch, London, 28 May.



The J.G. Ballard Book: An Interview with Rick McGrath

By • Dec 2nd, 2013 •

Category: advertising, Barcelona, biography, Chris Petit, Iain Sinclair, interviews, Lead Story, pastiche

Mike Holliday’s interview with Ballard fan Rick McGrath, who self-published The JG Ballard Book, an anthology of archival Ballard interviews, articles about JGB and other Ballardiana, including unpublished Ballard letters.



Animal Spirits: A Ballardian Bestiary

By • Dec 12th, 2011 •

Category: academia, advertising, Anthony Burgess, celebrity culture, features, Freud, Gilles Deleuze, Jean Baudrillard, Lead Story, media landscape, postmodernism, science fiction

In this excerpt from his book Animal Spirits, Matteo Pasquinelli explains how ‘the novels of J.G. Ballard can describe the nature of technology and the contemporary mediascape better than any philosopher, media theorist or cultural studies academic — a sort of political agenda born from the perspective of science fiction’.



A Fascist State? Another Look at Kingdom Come and Consumerism

By • Jul 7th, 2010 •

Category: advertising, architecture, Bentall Centre, celebrity culture, consumerism, dystopia, fascism, features, Lead Story, media landscape, Salvador Dali, Shanghai, speed & violence, sport, surrealism

Ballard’s final novel, Kingdom Come, a dystopian account of consumerism as a type of ’soft fascism’, received lukewarm reviews and suggestions that the author was, perhaps, finally losing his touch. Others were eager to point to parallels between it and events around us: aggressive car commercials, racist behaviour by sports fanatics. In this article, Mike Holliday re-examines Kingdom Come and asks: can we really equate consumerism with fascism?



Better Living through Psychopathology

By • May 16th, 2010 •

Category: academia, advertising, Ambit magazine, America, consumerism, features, inner space, media landscape, psychopathology, science fiction, space relics, visual art, WWIII

Examining Ballard’s artwork from the late 60s, Benjamin Noys uncovers a future that never took place. The image he focuses on appears as a very 60s image, yet it disjoints itself from that moment by its prescient refusal of the usual models of repression, liberation, and recuperation.



Ballardian.com’s ‘Top 10’ lists for 2009

By • Jan 4th, 2010 •

Category: advertising, architecture, Ballardosphere, film, invisible literature, sexual politics

Probably of no interest to anyone but me, but here goes: top 10 most-read posts on ballardian.com in 2009; top 10 search-engine phrases leading visitors to the site in 2009; and top 10 links from other sites in 2009.



Crown Casino: ‘A snarling, digitised mutilation’

By • May 27th, 2009 •

Category: advertising, alternate worlds, architecture, audio, Australia, boredom, CCTV, consumerism, death of affect, deep time, fascism, features, hyperreality, Lead Story, leisure, micronations, occult, perception, photography, psychogeography, schizophrenia, surveillance, temporality, time travel, utopia

Simon Sellars, Mel Chilianis and Melb Psy take an audiovisual tour of Melbourne’s Crown Casino, seeking to map the coordinates of this micronational zone — consumer-driven control space with a raging need.



‘What exactly is he trying to sell?’: J.G. Ballard’s Adventures in Advertising, part 2

By • May 8th, 2009 •

Category: advertising, Ambit magazine, consumerism, crime, Freud, Lead Story, media landscape, psychogeography, psychology

Rick McGrath continues to explore the aesthetic of the advertisement in J.G. Ballard’s work, from the early short stories right through to Kingdom Come.