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Archive for the ‘invisible literature’ Category

Venus Smiled: Tribute to Claire Walsh

By • Oct 21st, 2014 •

Category: advertising, Ambit magazine, architecture, Barcelona, biography, Claire Churchill, invisible literature, Lead Story, Michael Moorcock, New Worlds, visual art, Will Self

Recently, Claire Walsh died after battling with cancer. She was an editor and literary publicist, and J.G. Ballard’s long-time partner. Her intellect matched Ballard’s and pushed him into new territories, inspiring some of his best work. Collecting quotes from Ballard, Claire and articles from Ballardian and beyond, this tribute to Claire Walsh illustrates their symbiotic relationship.



Ballardian.com’s ‘Top 10′ lists for 2009

By • Jan 4th, 2010 •

Category: advertising, architecture, Ballardosphere, film, invisible literature, sexual politics

Probably of no interest to anyone but me, but here goes: top 10 most-read posts on ballardian.com in 2009; top 10 search-engine phrases leading visitors to the site in 2009; and top 10 links from other sites in 2009.



Iterative Architecture: a Ballardian Text

By • Jul 23rd, 2009 •

Category: academia, alternate worlds, America, architecture, death of affect, deep time, features, film, inner space, invisible literature, Lead Story, memory, New Worlds, pastiche, perception, Shanghai, short stories, time travel, WWII

Readers hoping to solve the mystery of J.G. Ballard’s ‘The Beach Murders’ may care to approach it in the form of a card game. Some of the principal clues have been alphabetized, some left as they were found, scrawled on to the backs of a deck of cards. Readers are invited to recombine the order of the cards to arrive at a solution. Obviously any number of solutions is possible, and the final answer to the mystery lies forever hidden.



Iterative Architecture: a Ballardian Text, part 2

By • Jul 23rd, 2009 •

Category: academia, alternate worlds, America, architecture, death of affect, deep time, film, inner space, invisible literature, memory, New Worlds, pastiche, perception, Shanghai, short stories, temporality, time travel, WWII

‘Iterative Architecture: a Ballardian Text’ by Brian Baker ..:: CONTINUED from >> Part 1 ::… ♣♠♥♦ The Joker. The Joker in the pack is the card that, in some games, can replace (or substitute for, take the place of) any of the others. In this sense, the Joker is the empty sign. ♣♠♥♦ Hearts ♥ […]



‘What exactly is he trying to sell?': J.G. Ballard’s Adventures in Advertising, part 1

By • May 4th, 2009 •

Category: advertising, Ambit magazine, consumerism, features, invisible literature, media landscape, New Worlds, sexual politics, Shanghai, visual art

The aesthetic of the advertisement appears again and again in J.G. Ballard’s work. Here, Rick McGrath explores Ballard’s fascination with the structure of advertising, and the role of the advertising man himself, examining ersatz ads in detail right across the body of JGB’s work.



JGB News Online

By • Oct 14th, 2008 •

Category: Ballardosphere, invisible literature

David Pringle’s JGB News archive is finally online.



Escaping the gaze: A review of John Foxx's Tiny Colour Movies

By • Aug 7th, 2008 •

Category: alternate worlds, America, architecture, CCTV, Chris Marker, Chris Petit, film, Iain Sinclair, invisible literature, John Foxx, media landscape, music, reviews, YouTube

This is a review of John Foxx’s Melbourne performance of Tiny Colour Movies, his found-film collection and live soundtrack. For the reviewer, witnessing this may have solved a two-year-old puzzle; certainly, it brought everything full circle back to Ballard.



'The happy notion of the life-time-novel'

By • Jul 1st, 2008 •

Category: Ballardosphere, film, invisible literature

Martin Jones finds out that JGB most certainly does not sell film rights over the phone.



Chemical Appendix: The Complete C&I Reviews

By • Aug 1st, 2007 •

Category: archival, invisible literature

From 1958 to 1964, J.G. Ballard worked at Chemistry & Industry, the journal of the Society of Chemical Industry. As we’ve already discovered, what happened at C&I codified the tropes Ballard was to return to throughout his subsequent writing career — the scientific, technical and imaginative motifs that shape the very essence of what we’ve […]



J.G. Ballard's Experiment in Chemical Living

By • Aug 1st, 2007 •

Category: advertising, features, invisible literature, Michael Moorcock, New Worlds, Shepperton, William Burroughs

by Mike Bonsall J.G. Ballard in 1960. In the background is a poster of his ‘Project for a new novel’, made two years earlier. Chemistry & Industry … was a good place to work because, of course, the office of any scientific magazine is the most wonderful mail drop. It’s the ultimate information crossroads. Most […]



Yellow

By • Jun 21st, 2007 •

Category: Ballardosphere, invisible literature, Steven Spielberg

On the subject of holiday reading, JGB dredges up the old Yellow Pages anecdote again: I have only stolen one book in my life, and that was a copy of the Los Angeles Yellow Pages, which I took from my suite at the Beverly Hilton hotel. This was in 1987 when I attended the premiere […]



‘The Stuff of Now': Toby Litt on J.G. Ballard

By • May 2nd, 2007 •

Category: Australia, consumerism, interviews, invisible literature, literature, medical procedure, suburbia, Toby Litt

Interview by Gwyn Richards & Simon Sellars Toby Litt is an English novelist who published his first book, Adventures in Capitalism (a volume of short stories), in 1996, when he was 28. He’s since won praise for the dark inventiveness of his writing, a combination of cinematic prose, apocalyptic imagery and sharp wit that freely […]



A Film Guide to Virtual Death

By • Apr 24th, 2007 •

Category: death of affect, film, invisible literature, media landscape, short stories, television

This is Xander Walker’s excellent no-budget film of Ballard’s dark, scathing short story ‘A Guide to Virtual Death’ (one of the last shorts JGB ever wrote, unfortunately): For reasons amply documented elsewhere, intelligent life on Earth became extinct in the closing hours of the 20th Century. Among the clues left to us, the following schedule […]



Crimes of the Near Future: Baudrillard / Ballard

By • Mar 21st, 2007 •

Category: academia, consumerism, crime, features, invisible literature, Jean Baudrillard, media landscape, visual art

i.m. Jean Baudrillard by Benjamin Noys ———————————————————————————————————————- In the wake of Jean Baudrillard’s death, Ballardian presents Benjamin Noys’s essay exploring the ‘point of convergence between the writing of Jean Baudrillard and J.G. Ballard’. This is a slightly modified version of the article that appeared as ‘Crimes of the Near Future: Baudrillard / Ballard’, Ícone 9 […]



Invisible Literature

By • Feb 9th, 2007 •

Category: Ballardosphere, invisible literature

I previously posted about the “Hemingwayesque” Ballard short story, “The Violent Noon”. I subsequently admitted I’d only read Papa’s The Sun Also Rises and The Old Man and the Sea, and therefore wasn’t really qualified to judge the story’s Hemingwayesque qualities. For this I was taken to task and told to read 49 of Hem’s […]



A User's Guide to the Millennium (1996)

By • Sep 5th, 2006 •

Category: advertising, architecture, bibliography, boredom, celebrity culture, consumerism, death of affect, deep time, dystopia, enviro-disaster, fashion, film, flying, humour, invisible literature, media landscape, medical procedure, non-fiction, photography, politics, psychogeography, psychology, Salvador Dali, science fiction, sexual politics, space relics, speed & violence, surrealism, television, urban decay, visual art, William Burroughs, WWII

OPENING LINE: “In his prime the Hollywood screenwriter was one of the tragic figures of our age, evoking the special anguish that arises from feeling sorry for oneself while making large amounts of money”. (from ‘The Sweet Smell of Excess’). From the 1996 Harper Collins edition: The first-ever collection of J.G. Ballard’s articles and reviews, […]



J.G. Ballard: The Complete Short Stories, vols 1 & 2 (2006)

By • Sep 1st, 2006 •

Category: advertising, architecture, bibliography, boredom, celebrity culture, consumerism, death of affect, deep time, dystopia, enviro-disaster, flying, humour, invisible literature, media landscape, medical procedure, New Worlds, photography, politics, psychogeography, psychology, science fiction, sexual politics, Shepperton, short stories, space relics, speed & violence, suicide, surrealism, television, terrorism, urban decay, urban revolt, visual art, WWII

OPENING LINE: “I first met Jane Ciracylides during the Recess, that world slump of boredom, lethargy and high summer which carried us all so blissfully through ten unforgettable years, and I suppose that may have had a lot to do with what went on between us.” (from ‘Prima Belladonna’). From the 2001 Flamingo edition (originally […]



'Child of the Diaspora': Sterling on Ballard

By • Oct 7th, 2005 •

Category: Ballardosphere, Bruce Sterling, cyberpunk, enviro-disaster, flying, interviews, invisible literature, medical procedure, science fiction, sexual politics, Shepperton, urban decay, William Burroughs

Bruce Sterling is a prolific science-fiction writer, futurist, social critic and design professor, best known for his bestselling novels and seminal short fiction, and as the editor of the Mirrorshades anthology that defined the ‘cyberpunk’ subgenre. His nonfiction includes works of futurism such as Tomorrow Now; a regular column and blog for Wired; and his […]