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Archive for the ‘visual art’ Category

High-Rise: All the Posters So Far

By • Mar 3rd, 2016 •

Category: advertising, Ben Wheatley, features, film, Lead Story, visual art

Feast your eyes on all the promotional posters for Ben Wheatley’s High-Rise…

“There comes a time when some sort of radical action is needed. Some of my novels, like High-Rise, are terrorist novels in that they’re designed to deliberately provoke.” J.G. Ballard.



Venus Smiled: Tribute to Claire Walsh

By • Oct 21st, 2014 •

Category: advertising, Ambit magazine, architecture, Barcelona, biography, Claire Churchill, features, invisible literature, Lead Story, Michael Moorcock, New Worlds, visual art, Will Self

Recently, Claire Walsh died after battling with cancer. She was an editor and literary publicist, and J.G. Ballard’s long-time partner. Her intellect matched Ballard’s and pushed him into new territories, inspiring some of his best work. Collecting quotes from Ballard, Claire and articles from Ballardian and beyond, this tribute to Claire Walsh illustrates their symbiotic relationship.



CRASH: Adaptación de un fragmento de la novela de J. Ballard

By • Oct 11th, 2014 •

Category: Argentina, Borges, comics, features, Lead Story, speed & violence, visual art

The Ballardian is proud to present Crash by Argentine graphic artist Sanyú, a graphic adaptation of a fragment of Ballard’s novel by that name, originally published in 1991 in legendary Argentine magazine Fierro.



Crash and the Aesthetics of Disappearance

By • Oct 22nd, 2013 •

Category: features, Jean Baudrillard, Lead Story, speed & violence, visual art

Art critic Andrew Frost explores the power of J.G. Ballard’s crashed-car metaphor as it spans two exhibitions 42 years apart: Ballard’s own ‘Crashed Cars’ show of 1970, and Ms&Mr’s 2012 Ballard-referencing video exhibition, Videodromes for the Alone: Amputee for the Neurotic Future 1988/2012.



Cosmic Sentinels and Spiral Jetties: J.G. Ballard, Robert Smithson & Tacita Dean

By • Mar 3rd, 2013 •

Category: architecture, deep time, features, film, Lead Story, Robert Smithson, Tacita Dean, temporality, urban decay, urban ruins, visual art

Tacita Dean’s new film, JG, is currently on view at the Arcadia University Art Gallery. JG is inspired by Dean’s correspondence with J.G. Ballard, and explores connections between his short story ‘The Voices of Time’ and Robert Smithson’s iconic earthwork and film Spiral Jetty. To celebrate Dean’s new work, Andrew Frost explores the enduring and mysterious relationship between Ballard, Smithson and Dean.



David Pelham: The Art of Inner Space

By • Feb 26th, 2012 •

Category: America, Brigid Marlin, deep time, dystopia, Eduardo Paolozzi, entropy, enviro-disaster, inner space, interviews, Lead Story, visual art

David Pelham produced perhaps the most Ballardian images ever to grace the covers of Ballard’s novels, prompted by this brief from the author himself: ‘‘monumental/tombstones/airless thermonuclear landscape/horizons/a zone devoid of time’. Here, Pelham discusses his apocalyptic art with James Pardey.



‘A temporarily tame tiger’: Brigid Marlin on J.G. Ballard, Paul Delvaux and surrealist art

By • Jan 3rd, 2012 •

Category: Barcelona, Brigid Marlin, Iain Sinclair, inner space, interviews, John Baxter, Lead Story, Lucien Freud, Paul Delvaux, religion, Salvador Dali, Stanley Kubrick, Steven Spielberg, surrealism, visual art

Andrew Bishop’s fascinating interview with artist Brigid Marlin, who created for Ballard two of the more enduring symbols of his career: reproductions of lost paintings by surrealist Paul Delvaux, which adorned Ballard’s Shepperton home and formed beguiling conversation pieces for visiting interviewers.



Flaunting Conventions: Paolozzi, Ballard and Bax

By • Jan 29th, 2011 •

Category: academia, Ambit magazine, Eduardo Paolozzi, features, Lead Story, visual art

To promote the one-day conference ‘Eduardo Paolozzi Re-readings’ at Manchester Metropolitan University on 18 February, we present excerpts from David Brittain’s essay on the relationship between Paolozzi, Ballard and Ambit’s Martin Bax.



Landscapes From a Dream: How the Art of David Pelham Captured the Essence of J G Ballard’s Early Fiction

By • Jun 14th, 2010 •

Category: deep time, Ernst, features, inner space, Lead Story, New Worlds, Salvador Dali, short stories, surrealism, visual art

For Ballard surrealist art was one of many possible routes to inner space. But inner space in its quintessentially Ballardian form needed something other than surrealist reproductions on the covers of his books. This was the challenge facing David Pelham, when Penguin’s Ballard titles came up for reprint.



Better Living through Psychopathology

By • May 16th, 2010 •

Category: academia, advertising, Ambit magazine, America, consumerism, features, inner space, media landscape, psychopathology, science fiction, space relics, visual art, WWIII

Examining Ballard’s artwork from the late 60s, Benjamin Noys uncovers a future that never took place. The image he focuses on appears as a very 60s image, yet it disjoints itself from that moment by its prescient refusal of the usual models of repression, liberation, and recuperation.



Simon O’Carrigan’s The Drowned World

By • Mar 28th, 2010 •

Category: animation, entropy, enviro-disaster, features, Freud, Lacan, Lead Story, urban decay, urban ruins, visual art

Ballardian.com presents selections taken from artist Simon O’Carrigan’s mixed-media series “The Drowned World”, a title taken in reference to a speculative fiction that inspired much of the imagery in this work: J.G. Ballard’s The Drowned World.



“Ambiguous aims”: a review of Crash: Homage to J.G. Ballard [NSFW]

By • Mar 12th, 2010 •

Category: America, Andy Warhol, celebrity culture, Lead Story, media landscape, nuclear war, reviews, Salvador Dali, speed & violence, visual art, WWII

Ballard’s writing has a strong connection to visual art. It informed his work and led to him befriending some of the leading artists of his time, while in turn his work has influenced today’s crop. As Ben Austwick reports, the exhibition Crash: Homage to J.G. Ballard represent these diverse strands in a haphazard, yet always interesting fashion.